At startupnoon.com, we aim to provide authoritative, trustworthy, expert advice. Our staff thoroughly researches, edits, and fact-checks all content. If you think we can improve this article, please email [email protected].

4.7/5 - (3 votes)

A limited liability company (LLC) is a really good choice for a business today. The job market in the United States is hot but also faces a lot of rising interest rates. Inflation has affected buyer confidence but still sees large spending due to income growth trying to outpace inflation.

Contents

In a rush? Here’s the blog post summary

– A limited liability company (LLC) is a really good choice for a business today.

– The most imperative document you need to file may be called Articles of Organization, but this may differ depending on the state.

– This can be a point of confusion for LLCs looking to form in Delaware, as this must be done with the Delaware Division of Corporations.

– Make sure you do your due diligence in checking for the right documents for your type of business.
By default, LLCs get pass-through taxation.

– FICO notes that credit utilization should not be more than 30% of one’s available credit limit at any given time, so this business structure is great for potential debt consolidation.

The liability and asset protection that come with the structure of an LLC makes it the perfect type of entity to face a promising yet equally challenging landscape. An LLC also happens to be simple to form, forgiving in terms of taxes, and rather flexible in structure. Of course, this doesn’t mean that you are completely free of legal culpability. Make sure you stay in good standing by taking note of some important legal details when forming your LLC.

1. Naming Conventions

The first thing you need to consider is your LLC’s name. Each state has particular guidelines, but you’ll generally want to avoid any names that are used by government agencies. You also cannot use words that may get your business potentially misconstrued as a law or medical service.

You also need to be very clear about the nature of your business. If you’re forming an LLC in Florida, the registered name of your business needs to have the phrase “Limited Liability Company”, “LLC”, or “L.L.C.” The state allows a fictitious name you can operate under aside from the formal name that you apply with. Other states like Pennsylvania also have blasphemy laws that restrict what names you can use if it can be considered religiously inflammatory.

2. Applying for the Right Articles of Organization

The process of LLC formation is very simple, though it’s easy to slip up if you’re not paying attention to the specific requirements that apply to your state. The most imperative document you need to file may be called Articles of Organization, but this may differ depending on the state.

For instance, both New Jersey and Delaware will instead require a Certificate of Formation. You should also take care not to accidentally get Articles of Incorporation, which apply if you are forming a corporation. This can be a point of confusion for LLCs looking to form in Delaware, as this must be done with the Delaware Division of Corporations. It’s also worth noting that filing fees will also vary.

3. Relevant Permits and Licenses

Even if you’re forming an LLC, the specific nature of your business will still determine what licenses and permits you need regardless of where you operate. Certain cities require general business licenses, so make sure to check with your Secretary of State.

A very viable company in America is a Real Estate Investment Trust (REIT), which produces a lot of jobs and has an impactful economic contribution. An LLC would be a very feasible entity structure for this type of business because of tax purposes. That said, this also requires operating licenses, relevant real estate permits, and listing requirements. Make sure you do your due diligence in checking for the right documents for your type of business.

4. Choosing How to Be Taxed

You also need to decide early on how you want to be taxed. By default, LLCs get pass-through taxation. However, you can also choose to be taxed as a corporation. How you choose to be taxed will have its own legal considerations, as well as pros and cons depending on your needs.

Both of these can be taxed to the level of personal income, but the difference will come mostly in your tax filing. An ‘Entrepreneur Would Most Likely be Interested In’ better financial management, networking opportunities, and risk mitigation. These factors can heavily depend on your tax classification. This can also depend on your state, as that can determine what setup will be most beneficial for your company. For instance, Wyoming ranks well for LLC taxation but actually fares even better for corporate tax.

5. State Liability and Compliance

Even LLCs aren’t completely free of liability. You will still need to stick to business compliance measures imposed by federal and state governments in order to continue operating. Otherwise, you could be subject to penalties or have your license to operate revoked.

You are also directly liable if you are personally held responsible for any negligence or abuse directed toward an employee or individual affected by your business. Of course, you are still protected from liability for debts and obligations incurred in the name of your LLC.

FICO notes that credit utilization should not be more than 30% of one’s available credit limit at any given time, so this business structure is great for potential debt consolidation. This can be especially useful if you’re staying in a state with particularly high debt and credit card burdens. For instance, Nevada ranks very well for LLC fees but also happens to rank fifth in average credit balance throughout the country.

0 CommentsClose Comments

Leave a Reply